Friday, 2 June 2017

Never forget the basics of customer service

Scotsman Robert Burns wrote his famous ‘To a Mouse’ poem in 1786. These words – translated from the original scots dialect - are often quoted: “The best laid schemes of mice and men often go awry, and leave us nought but grief and pain for promised joy”. Avoiding any discussion as to whether I am a man or a mouse, I can tell you that things certainly went awry for me this weekend.

What nicer thing to do on a warm summer's day in the beautiful county of Kent than to go into a typically English pub for a pint of beer and a sandwich. I enquired at the bar if sandwiches were available and was told that yes they could provide some, but then on taking my table the waitress said this was wrong and all she could offer me was some courgettes soup.

Oh well, this was not the end of the world, and I do love soup, but unfortunately it seemed that this bowl had not been within a metre of a courgette at any point. What I did taste, in large unappealing quantity, was pepper. The waitress asked if I enjoyed it, I told her no, and she shrugged her shoulders and walked off. I will not be returning.

Later I went to a hotel for an overnight stay with my family, before going to visit my aunt in a care home. On arrival everything was perfect and we drifted off into a peaceful sleep… and then it was at around 3 am when we were awakened by a group of young people out in the corridor who were not aware of their surroundings or the time of day. On check out we reported this to the front desk and there was an apology, and a small refund. I think the refund should have been larger, but at least the gesture was made.  

To complete the trilogy that I'm presenting to you, we then attended a friend’s funeral only to find that our flowers had not been delivered. On telephoning the florist she was horrified that they had made a mistake, and she immediately said, “What can I do to rectify this”? She went on to fully refund our money, and to send a beautiful bunch of flowers to my friend's daughter, and even photographed the flowers and sent the picture to us. This was genuine and exemplary service, the emphasis being on the word ‘genuine’.


We teach marketing and customer service, and cover a whole range of technical aspects. Those aspects are important, yet we must never forget the basics, to remember that the customer will often forgive you your mistakes, and that you will typically retain their business, if you react with a genuine and honest response. That’s our preferred way here at ECBM.

It doesn't have to cost you money, or at least not much, but attending to the basics will save your reputation, and avoid negative word of mouth advertising. “Don’t we all know this already?” I here you say. Well yes we do, but in our busy lives we sometimes forget, or perhaps it is only ‘other people’ who get it wrong?

It is a commercial tragedy if companies pay out thousands of pounds on advertising campaigns, and then forget the basic elements of customer care. It’s all about building relationships and establishing trust with your customer. Likewise in education, relationships and trust are primary determinants of effective learning and growth.

Graham Harman-Baker

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